December 30th, 2012

Coats awaiting kids

by louiev

July 4th, 2012

(July 04) Today we’re celebrating. . .  (US) Independence Day

Independence Day (4th of July – US)
Celebrating the 235th birthday of the United States of America: On this day in 1776, the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress.

And in honor of the day – Holidays on the Net invites you to celebrate America’s birthday with us.

Whether you enjoy BBQs, fireworks or picnics in the park, we’ve got plenty of fun for your 4th of July. To help your family get into the independence spirit, we also have a trove of craft projects and coloring pictures that are perfect for kids young and old.

If you’re a history buff, Independence Day is probably one of your favorite holidays. What better way to relive our nation’s history than to spend its birthday visiting the national monuments and memorials in Washington, DC?

Or you can visit our site for a refresher on the history of the Pledge of Allegiance, the timeline of the American Flag and the full text and signers of the Declaration of Independence. And if you’re a trivia freak, you don’t want to miss our Did You Know? Facts and Figures about July 4th.

Are you planning to host or attend a 4th of July cookout (would it be July 4th if you didn’t?!) Be sure to peruse all our great grill recipes — plus our patriotic pastries, like Mom’s Favorite Apple Pie.

We look forward to hosting you at our biggest birthday bash yet!

And a bit of holiday trivia – Today is also the anniversary of the song – America the Beautiful.

by The Holiday Bot



June 14th, 2012

(June 14) Today we’re observing . . .  Flag Day / National Flag Day USA

Flag Day
By Presidential Proclamation; honors and celebrates our flag, our country, and our heritage.

National Flag Day USA: Pause for Pledge
All Americans are asked to pause at 7PM EST to share a moment of nationwide patriotism.

 

Related link: Independence Day on the Net – U.S. Flag Etiquette

by The Holiday Bot

March 19th, 2012

Passover – The Story and The Traditions

The Jewish holiday of Passover is one filled with rich tradition. But, even more than on any other Jewish holiday, the biggest tradition (and commandment) of Passover is actually the story itself. Jews are commanded to tell the story of Passover in each generation as if it were we, ourselves, who were freed from slavery in Egypt.

Different from most Jewish holidays (in which the religious observance takes place mostly in the synagogue), on Passover the observance takes place at home with a festival meal and re-telling of the Passover story. Called the Seder, this festival meal and service is celebratory and educational, filled with delicious food, tradition and symbolism. The “instruction manual” for the Seder is a book called the Hagaddah (which actually means the telling.) On every Seder table, appear the symbols through which the story is told. And how do we tell the story as if we were actually participants in the Exodus from Egypt? By becoming participants in the story . . . by not just reading about the symbols–but by tasting, using, and experiencing the symbols. By questioning, debating, discussing . . . and singing!

Perhaps the best-recognized symbol of Passover is the Matzah–the unleavened bread. By eating it for seven days during Passover instead of regular bread, we actually become the Israelites in such a hurry to escape Egypt before Pharaoh changed his mind that they didn’t even take time to let their bread rise. As the central symbol of Passover, the Matzah has an honored place on the Seder table, usually placed in an exquisite Matzah Cover.

The other symbols of the Passover Seder also hold places of honor at the table, displayed beautifully on a traditional Seder Plate. This plate often has a section for each of the symbols and a label in Hebrew or in English (or both) to remind us what goes there: parsley, a lamb bone, a roasted egg, bitter herb, salt water, and charoset (a delicious mixture of apples, nuts, and wine).

And let’s not forget the wine! At the Seder it’s traditional to drink four cups. So, at the center of the table stands an ornate Kiddush Cup used especially for blessing the wine and consecrating the specialness of the day.

One of the most beautiful traditions of the Seder is that of welcoming all to join us: the old and young, the poor and wealthy, the Jew and non-Jew. So, it’s not uncommon for non-Jews to attend a Passover Seder from time to time. All are welcome to tell the story, to participate in the traditions, and to enjoy the sounds and tastes of this festive springtime holiday. Happy Passover! Chag sameyach!

by The Holiday Bot



February 20th, 2012

The Holy Singer




The Holy Singer

Originally uploaded by © Poras Chaudhary


by louiev

February 14th, 2012

Today we’re celebrating . . .  Valentine’s Day!

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Valentine’s Day
A Day for love and lovers. A day for flowers, romance, and candy hearts. A day for Cupid, kisses and snuggling galore!

Come and join us as we celebrate Valentine’s DayAmore on the Net

by The Holiday Bot

February 8th, 2012

Tu B’Shevat, February 8th, 2012

Tu B’Shevat, the 15th day of the Jewish month of Shevat is a holiday also celebrated as the New Year for Trees.

Tu B’Shevat is the new year for the purpose of calculating the age of trees for tithing, which states that fruit from trees may not be eaten during the first three years.  Each tree is considered to have aged one year as of Tu B’Shevat, so if you planted a tree on Shevat 14, it begins its second year the next day, but if you plant a tree two days later, on Shevat 16, it does not reach its second year until the next Tu B’Shevat.

by The Holiday Bot

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