Archive for August 6th, 2009

(August 06) Today we're celebrating . . .  National Fresh Breath Day

Thursday, August 6th, 2009

National Fresh Breath Day
A minty fresh day to you all!

Today’s the day to bring awareness of how important fresh breath is to your health.

Remember – if your find that your morning breath lasts all day long – then ahhhh – you’ve got a problem!

photo credit: via flickr

(August 06) Today we're observing . . .  Hiroshima Day (Anniversary of Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, Japan)

Thursday, August 6th, 2009

215px-atomic_cloud_over_hiroshima
Hiroshima Day
(Anniversary of Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima, Japan)

The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were nuclear attacks near the end of World War II against the Empire of Japan by the United States at the executive order of U.S. President Harry S. Truman on August 6 and August 9, 1945, respectively. After six months of intense fire-bombing of 67 other Japanese cities, followed by an ultimatum which was ignored by the Showa regime, the nuclear weapon “Little Boy” was dropped on the city of Hiroshima on Monday, August 6, 1945, followed on August 9 by the detonation of the “Fat Man” nuclear bomb over Nagasaki. These are to date the only attacks with nuclear weapons in the history of warfare.

The bombs killed as many as 140,000 people in Hiroshima and 80,000 in Nagasaki by the end of 1945, roughly half on the days of the bombings. Amongst these, 15–20% died from injuries or the combined effects of flash burns, trauma, and radiation burns, compounded by illness, malnutrition and radiation sickness. Since then, more have died from leukemia (231 observed) and solid cancers (334 observed) attributed to exposure to radiation released by the bombs. In both cities, the majority of the dead were civilians.

Six days after the detonation over Nagasaki, on August 15, Japan announced its surrender to the Allied Powers, signing the Instrument of Surrender on September 2, officially ending the Pacific War and therefore World War II. (Germany had signed its unavoidable Instrument of Surrender on May 7, ending the war in Europe.) The bombings led, in part, to post-war Japan adopting Three Non-Nuclear Principles, forbidding that nation from nuclear armament.*

*Photo/Quote Source: Wikipedia – Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki

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