Archive for December, 2010

Did You Know? Countdown to New Years Day (12/31)

Friday, December 31st, 2010

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures &
Folklore about About
New Year’s Eve &
New Year’s Day

Dec 31 : New Years Eve
1 Day till New Years Day

Did you know that “Auld Lang Syne” was written in the 1700′s?

The song was written by Robert Burns in Scotland, as a song of remembrance and reflection. The traditional New Year’s song, played on New Year’s Eve at the strike of midnight, was published in 1796 after Burns’ death. “Auld Lang Syne” is Scottish for “old long ago”.

It’s the most commonly sung song for English-speakers on New Year’s Eve. Guy Lombardo, who popularized the piece with his band, first heard the song sung by Scottish immigrants. From 1929-1959 his band played every New Year’s at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York, with the first radio broadcast in 1929. The first televised New Year’s celebration with Lombardo’s band was in 1954 and continued until 1976. Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve televised broadcast began on December 31, 1972 to bring in a “younger crowd”, but, kept Lombardo’s rendition of Auld Lang Syne to be the first song played in the new year. For many, not hearing it would make their New Year celebration seem “unofficial,” somehow.

The New Year is a time of friends and family, and parties and fun. A time of fireworks, counting down and rockin’ out with good ol’ Dick Clark (& that Seacrest guy). It’s a time for resolutions, realizations, and a brand new year.

Join us for a new Did You Know holiday fact each day as we countdown to the new year. New Years Eve will be celebrated Friday December 31st. New Years Day is Saturday January 01, 2011!

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to Kwanzaa (12/31)

Friday, December 31st, 2010

diduknowkw

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures &
Folklore about Kwanzaa

Dec 31 : Sixth Day of Kwanzaa

Did you know today is the sixth day of Kwanzaa?

On the sixth day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, the farthest right green, the next red, the next green and then the final red candle. This represents the 6th principle of Kwanzaa - Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah): Creativity.

The sixth day, which occurs on New Years Eve, is a special day. This is the day of the Kwanzaa Karamu or Kwanzaa Feast. It is also a special day to remember the family’s ancestors when the Unity cup is shared. After everyone has taken a drink the candles are extinguished.

But before the Karamu is over, the eldest member of those present will read the Tamshi La Tutaonana (TAM-shi la Tu-ta-u-NA-na) as a farewell statement to the feast and the year.

Then the elder leads the guests in the Harambee (ha-RAM-bee) salute. Each person raises their right fist about as high as their shoulder, then pulls down forcefully until the elbow is next to next to their torso, saying “Harambee!” This is done seven times in unison. This concludes the Karamu celebration.

Kwanzaa is a 7 day festival celebrating the African American people, their culture and their history. It is a time of celebration, community gathering, and reflection. A time of endings and beginnings. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and continues until New Years Day, January 1st.

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(December 31) Today we’re celebrating. . .  New Years Eve

Friday, December 31st, 2010
New Years Eve (Dec 31)

Happy New Year! The last night of the Gregorian calendar means
it’s time to ring in the new year in style.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and days of auld lang syne?
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and days of auld lang syne?
And here’s a hand, my trusty friend
And gie’s a hand o’ thine
We’ll tak’ a cup o’ kindness yet
For auld lang syne

Photo Credit via Flickr: Paul Mannix.

Visit our New Year celebration: New Year on the Net

(December 31) Today we’re celebrating. . .  The 6th Day of Kwanzaa

Friday, December 31st, 2010

The 6th Day of Kwanzaa
The 6th day of a week long festival celebrating the African American people, their culture and their history.

On the sixth day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, the farthest right green, the next red, the next green and then the final red candle. This represents the 6th principle of Kwanzaa – Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah): Creativity.

The sixth day, which occurs on New Years Eve, is a special day. This is the day of the Kwanzaa Karamu or Kwanzaa Feast. In the spirit of celebration many families invite their friends and family to join in the festivities.

source: Kwanzaa on the Net – Seven Days of Celebration

Did You Know? Countdown to New Years Day (12/30)

Thursday, December 30th, 2010

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures &
Folklore about About
New Year’s Eve &
New Year’s Day

Dec 30 : 1 Day till New Years Eve
2 Days till New Years Day

Did you know that prior to 1904, New Year’s Eve was celebrated in New York with much less pomp and partying?

Several innovations transformed New York that year: the invention of neon lights, the opening of New York’s first subway line; and the first celebration of New Year’s Eve in Times Square.

The New York Times had just completed building the Times Tower at the intersection of 7th Avenue, Broadway and 42nd Street – dubbed the “Crossroads of the World”. On December 31, 1904, the new building was the focus of an all-day festival concluding in a fireworks display ignited from the base of the tower. At midnight the raucous sound of cheering from over 200,000 merry makers was the genesis of a new tradition.

Today, New Year’s Eve in Times Square is a phenomenon, with hundreds of thousands of people continuing to gather at the Time Tower, now known as One Times Square, waiting in the New York winter. Thanks to satellite technology, a global audience, estimated at over one billion people, watches this ceremony each year.

Did you know that the first use of a Time Square New Year’s Eve Ball was the result of New York city banning fireworks because they were too dangerous?

The owner of the New York Times arranged to have an illuminated seven-hundred-pound iron and wood ball to be lowered from the tower flagpole (77 feet, 23 meters) precisely at midnight to signal the end of 1907. In 1914, The New York Times outgrew Times Tower and relocated to West 43rd Street. By then, however, New Year’s Eve in Times Square had become part of the American tradition.

The New Year is a time of friends and family, and parties and fun. A time of fireworks, counting down and rockin’ out with good ol’ Dick Clark (& that Seacrest guy). It’s a time for resolutions, realizations, and a brand new year.

Join us for a new Did You Know holiday fact each day as we countdown to the new year. New Years Eve will be celebrated Friday December 31st. New Years Day is Saturday January 01, 2011!

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to Kwanzaa (12/30)

Thursday, December 30th, 2010

diduknowkw

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures &
Folklore about Kwanzaa

Dec 30 : Fifth Day of Kwanzaa

Did you know today is the fifth day of Kwanzaa?

On the fifth day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, the farthest right green, the next red and then the next green candle. This represents the 5th principle of KwanzaaNia (NEE-ah): Purpose.

The fifth principle is discussed. The family shares the Unity cup and the candles are extinguished.

Kwanzaa is a 7 day festival celebrating the African American people, their culture and their history. It is a time of celebration, community gathering, and reflection. A time of endings and beginnings. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and continues until New Years Day, January 1st.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

(December 30) Today we’re celebrating. . .  Oh My! Day

Thursday, December 30th, 2010


Oh My! Day

‘Twas the day before the night before New Years begins
Is it true? Can it be? That we’ve actually run out
Of silly festivals? Goofy names? A daily holiday drought?

There seems nothing left to celebrate
And we’re darn petered out!
We’ve done Blah Blah, zucchinis and a great apple pie.
But Oh My!? Oh My!? Oh My My My My!

Is it possible on this 364th day of the year
We have nothing to celebrate, no jollies, no cheer?

So on this day before the night before a new year begins
Let’s celebrate this new one. Oh My! Come on friends
But Oh Why you may ask? Oh My!? But Why?
As the Sulu proclaims – “OH MY!”
That’s why!

photo credit: Dalla* via flickr

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