Archive for December, 2010

Did You Know? Countdown to New Years Day (12/28)

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures &
Folklore about About
New Year’s Eve &
New Year’s Day

Dec 28 : 3 Days till New Years Eve
4 Days till New Years Day

Did you know that Western nations have only celebrated the New Year for the last four centuries?

In medieval Europe the celebrations accompanying the new year were considered pagan and unChristian. In 567, the Roman Catholic church abolished January 1 as the beginning of the year. Thereafter, at different times and in various places throughout medieval Christian Europe, the new year was celebrated on Dec. 25, the birth of Jesus; March 1; March 25, the Feast of the Annunciation; and Easter, which continues to be based on the lunar calendar.

In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII re-established January 1 as new year’s day with calendar reform. Today the Gregorian calendar has become the international standard for civil use.

Did you know that not all cultures and religions celebrate New Year’s Day on January 1st?

The Baha’i New Year, known as Naw Ruz or “New Day”, occurs on the Vernal Equinox.

The Islamic New Year begins on the first day of the first month (Muharram – December 18, 2009) of the Islamic calendar and is known as 1 Muharram. It is generally observed with quiet reflection and prayers.

Rosh Hashanah (September 19, 2009), New Years Day on the Jewish calendar, begins a 10 day period known as the High Holy Days - a time of penitence and prayer that ends with Yom Kippur.

In Japan, every February 3 or 4, based on the lunar calendar, Setsubun is celebrated. Although not a national holiday, Setsubun (“sectional/seasonal division”) has marked the last day of winter since the 13th century and is one day prior to the beginning of Spring, signifying a new year with the return of the warming sun, symbolic rebirth, rejuvenation of spirit and body, and preparing for the planting season.

The 15-day Chinese New Year (February 14, 2010) is celebrated on the second new moon (lunar) after the Winter Solstice (solar) – occurring between January 20-February 20 – culminating with the Lantern Festival

Did you know that Julius Caesar was the first to set January 1st as the New Year?

Caesar did so when he established the Julian calendar. The Julian calendar, named for Julius Caesar, decreed that the new year would occur on January 1st. Caesar wanted the year to begin in January since it celebrated the beginning of the civil year and the festival of the god of gates and, eventually, the god of all beginnings, Janus, after whom January was named.

The New Year is a time of friends and family, and parties and fun. A time of fireworks, counting down and rockin’ out with good ol’ Dick Clark (& that Seacrest guy). It’s a time for resolutions, realizations, and a brand new year.

Join us for a new Did You Know holiday fact each day as we countdown to the new year. New Years Eve will be celebrated Friday December 31st. New Years Day is Saturday January 01, 2011!

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

(December 28) Today we’re celebrating. . .  Pledge of Allegiance Day

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010


Pledge of Allegiance Day
On this day in 1945, the U.S. Congress recognized the Pledge of Allegiance and urged its recitation in American schools.

I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God*, indivisible, With Liberty and Justice for all.

*Did you know that “under God” was added in the 1950′s? More info: The Pledge of Allegiance (Independence Day on the Net)

(December 28) Today we’re celebrating. . .  The 3rd Day of Kwanzaa

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

The 3rd Day of Kwanzaa
The 3rd day of a week long festival celebrating the African American people, their culture and their history.

On the third day the black candle is lit, then the farthest left red, and then the farthest right green candle. This represents the 3rd principle of Kwanzaa – Ujima (oo-JEE-mah): Collective work and responsibility.

source: Kwanzaa on the Net – Seven Days of Celebration

Did You Know? Countdown to Kwanzaa (12/27)

Monday, December 27th, 2010

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Did You Know?
Facts, Figures &
Folklore about Kwanzaa

Dec 27 : Second Day of Kwanzaa

Did you know today is the second day of Kwanzaa?

On the second day the black candle is again lit, as well as the farthest red candle on the left. This represents the 2nd principle of KwanzaaKujichagulia (koo-jee-chah-goo-LEE-ah): Self-Determination.

Again a statement about the second principle and its meaning might be made. Or possibly a passage or poem is spoken or read which relates to what the principle means and how it relates to their life. The family shares the Unity cup and the candles are extinguished.

Kwanzaa is a 7 day festival celebrating the African American people, their culture and their history. It is a time of celebration, community gathering, and reflection. A time of endings and beginnings. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and continues until New Years Day, January 1st.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to New Years Day (12/27)

Monday, December 27th, 2010

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures &
Folklore about About
New Year’s Eve &
New Year’s Day

Dec 27 : 4 Days till New Years Eve
5 Days till New Years Day

Did you know that celebrating the New Year is a tradition that dates back nearly 4000 years?

If you had lived in Mesopotamia and Babylon 4,000 years ago (c. 2000 B.C.), you probably would have celebrated the new year in mid-March, at the time of the Vernal (Spring) Equinox. If, however, you were an Egyptian, your new year began with the Autumnal Equinox and the flooding of the Nile. If you were Greek, the Winter Solstice began your new year celebrations.

Did you know that Julius Caesar was the first to set January 1st as the New Year?

Caesar did so when he established the Julian calendar. The Julian calendar, named for Julius Caesar, decreed that the new year would occur on January 1st. Caesar wanted the year to begin in January since it celebrated the beginning of the civil year and the festival of the god of gates and, eventually, the god of all beginnings, Janus, after whom January was named.

The New Year is a time of friends and family, and parties and fun. A time of fireworks, counting down and rockin’ out with good ol’ Dick Clark (& that Seacrest guy). It’s a time for resolutions, realizations, and a brand new year.

Join us for a new Did You Know holiday fact each day as we countdown to the new year. New Years Eve will be celebrated Friday December 31st. New Years Day is Saturday January 01, 2011!

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

(December 27) Today we’re celebrating. . .  The 2nd Day of Kwanzaa

Monday, December 27th, 2010

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The 2nd Day of Kwanzaa
The 2nd day of a week long festival celebrating the African American people, their culture and their history.

On the second day the black candle is again lit, as well as the farthest red candle on the left. This represents the 2nd principle of Kwanzaa – Kujichagulia (koo-jee-chah-goo-LEE-ah): Self-Determination

source: Kwanzaa on the Net – Seven Days of Celebration

Did You Know? Countdown to Kwanzaa (12/26)

Sunday, December 26th, 2010

diduknowkw

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures &
Folklore about Kwanzaa

Dec 26 : First Day of Kwanzaa

Did you know today is the first day of Kwanzaa?

On the first day of Kwanzaa the black candle is lit in the Kinara. The black candle represents the first principleUmoja (oo-MOH-jah): Unity. The person who lights the candle might make a statement about the first principle and its meaning. Sometimes a passage or poem is read relating to what the principle means and how it relates to their life.

Then the Umoja (Unity Cup) might be filled with fruit juice and shared among those gathered. Each takes a drink and passes to the next. Some families prefer to use a Unity cup for each member, or the cup can just be left in the center of the Kwanzaa table. After the sharing of the Unity cup the candles are extinguished till the next day.

Kwanzaa is a 7 day festival celebrating the African American people, their culture and their history. It is a time of celebration, community gathering, and reflection. A time of endings and beginnings. Kwanzaa begins on December 26th and continues until New Years Day, January 1st.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

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