Archive for the 'Sukkot' Category

Holiday Invite: Yom Kippur on the Net

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

G’mar Chatima Tova!
May you be sealed in the Book of Life

Holidays on the Net is delighted to invite you to share in our commemoration of the holiest day in the Jewish calendar, Yom Kippur.

Known in English as the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur falls on the tenth day of the Jewish month of Tishrei — just a week and a half after the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah. The ten-day period between the High Holy Days is known as the Ten Days of Tshuva (Repentance), a time during which deep introspection and personal atonement is to take place.

Yom Kippur is a solemn day of fasting, repentance, and fervent prayer, which concludes with the blowing of the shofar. We invite you to come learn more about each of these rituals in our Yom Kippur overview.

Yom Kippur begins at sundown Friday October 07, 2011.

Wishing you a Tzom Kal, an easy fast.

Louie and the Holiday Elves

Did You Know? Countdown to Yom Kippur (10/06)

Thursday, October 6th, 2011

dyk-yk09

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures & Folklore
About Yom Kippur, the
Jewish Day of Atonement

Oct 06 : observed in 1 day

Did you know that Yom Kippur is a day of “NOT” doing?

There is no blowing of the Shofar and Jews may not eat or drink, as fasting is the rule. It is believed that to fast on Yom Kippur is to emulate the angels in heaven, who do not eat, drink, or wash.

Did you know that while Yom Kippur is devoted to fasting, the day before is devoted to eating?

According to the The Talmud the person “who eats on the ninth of Tishri (and fasts on the tenth) , it is as if he had fasted both the ninth and tenth.” Prayer is also down played so that Jews can concentrate on eating and preparing for the fast.

Known in English as the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur falls on the tenth day of the Jewish month of Tishrei — just a week and a half after the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah. The ten-day period between the High Holy Days is known as the Ten Days of Tshuva (Repentance), a time during which deep introspection and personal atonement is to take place.

We’ll be presenting a new “Did You Know?” fact each day as we countdown to Yom Kippur. Please join us!

Yom Kippur begins at sundown on Friday October 07, 2011.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

Did You Know? Countdown to Yom Kippur (10/05)

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

dyk-yk09

Did You Know?
Facts, Figures & Folklore
About Yom Kippur, the
Jewish Day of Atonement

Oct 05 : observed in 2 days

Did you know that Yom Kippur is known in English as the “Day of Atonement“?

In actuality, however, Yom Kippur is the culmination of 40 days of repentance and atonement, beginning with the first day of the Jewish month of Elul and continuing through the first ten days of the Jewish month of Tishrei. During this period, G-d is believed to be judging a person’s fate for the upcoming year.

Known in English as the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur falls on the tenth day of the Jewish month of Tishrei — just a week and a half after the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah. The ten-day period between the High Holy Days is known as the Ten Days of Tshuva (Repentance), a time during which deep introspection and personal atonement is to take place.

We’ll be presenting a new “Did You Know?” fact each day as we countdown to Yom Kippur. Please join us!

Yom Kippur begins at sundown on Friday October 07, 2011.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

2011 Rosh Hashanah Greeting From President Obama (video)

Thursday, September 29th, 2011
“Michelle and I wish you, your families,
and all who celebrate Rosh Hashanah a sweet year full of health, happiness, and peace”

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The White House has released President Obama’s video message for Rosh Hashanah 2011.

Hello, everybody. Shana Tova.

The days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are a time for repentance and reflection. An opportunity to reaffirm our friendships, renew our commitments, and reflect on the values we cherish.

As the High Holidays begin, we look back on all the moments during the past year that gave us reason to hope. Around the world, a new generation is reaching for their universal rights. Here in the United States, we’ve responded to our challenges by focusing on the things that really matter – friendship, family, and community.

But this last year was also one of hardship for people around the world. Too many of our friends and neighbors continue to struggle in the wake of a terrible economic recession. And beyond our borders, many of our closest allies – including the State of Israel – face the uncertainties of an unpredictable age.

That is why my Administration is doing everything we can to promote prosperity here at home and security and peace throughout the world – and that includes reaffirming our commitment to the State of Israel. While we cannot know all that the New Year will bring, we do know this: the United States will continue to stand with Israel, because the bond between our two nations is unshakable.

As Jewish tradition teaches us, we may not complete the work, but that must never keep us from trying. In that spirit, Michelle and I wish you, your families, and all who celebrate Rosh Hashanah a sweet year full of health, happiness, and peace.

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Holiday Invite: Rosh Hashanah 2011

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

hiho10Shanah Tova!
Happy New Year!

With the Jewish season of the High Holy Days upon us, we are delighted to invite you to come join our High Holiday Day celebrations at Holidays on the Net.

The Jewish High Holy Days refer to the ten-day period between the first day of the Jewish month of Tishrei, when Rosh Hashanah begins, and the tenth day of the month, when Yom Kippur falls.

These two holidays are the most significant in the Jewish calendar, a time rich in religious, spiritual and historical symbolism. On Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish people celebrate the beginning of a new year. The holiday is commemorated with special services, such as Tashlich (casting off of one’s sins), and the blowing of the shofar (and here). Rosh Hashanah is also a sacred time for ritualized family gatherings and sweet festive meals. And make your celebration a sweet and tasty one with our delicious holiday recipes.

Get the little ones interested in the holiday with our selection of fun and entertaining Rosh Hashanah crafts and holiday related coloring pictures. Send holiday greetings to your friends and family with our Rosh Hashanah eGreeting Cards.

Between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are the Days of Awe. During this ten-day period, the Jewish people stand before G-d, praying for forgiveness for their sins and hoping to be inscribed in the Book of Life. Then on Yom Kippur, which is also called the Day of Atonement, the Jewish people fast for 25 hours, during which they atone for their sins.

We hope that you will find something at Holidays on the Net that will help you better enjoy and appreciate these High Holy Days. We really look forward to seeing you at our High Holy Days celebration!

Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown Wednesday September 28. Yom Kippur begins at sundown on October 07.

Happy Holidays and Shanah Tova!

(September 29) Today we’re celebrating . . .  Rosh Hashanah

Thursday, September 29th, 2011

hiho10
Rosh Hashanah (Jewish)
Shana Tova! Today is Rosh Hashanah, the first day of the Jewish New Year, and Jews worldwide are celebrating.

While Rosh Hashanah is widely known and celebrated as the New Years Day of the Jewish calendar, Rosh Hashanah actually has a fourfold meaning – It is the Jewish New Year, the Day of Judgement, the Day of Remembrance, and the Day of Shofar Blowing.

It is the Day of Judgement
As Jews worldwide examine their past deeds and asks for forgiveness for their sins

It is the Day of Shofar Blowing
As the Shofar (the rams horn) is blown in temple to herald the beginning of the 10 day period known as the High Holy Days

It is the Day of Remembrance
As Jews review the history of their people and pray for Israel

And of course it is New Year’s Day
Celebrated with it’s holiday greeting cards, special prayers, and festive and sweet foods (to ensure sweetness in the New Year)

For more information visit our celebration of the Rosh Hashanah – High Holy Days on the Net

Did You Know? Rosh Hashanah (09/29)

Thursday, September 29th, 2011
dykrh

Did You Know?
Sept 29

Thanks for joining us as as we counted down to Rosh Hashanah and the Jewish High Holy Days. Come back and join us again for another “Did You Know” holiday countdown!

Shanah Tovah U’Metukah,**
Louie and the Holiday Elves

*Rosh Hashanah began last night at sundown.
**May you have a good and sweet new year.

Signup for our Did You Know? Holiday Countdown emails or follow us on Twitter – twitter.com/holidaysnet (@holidaysnet)

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